Neuropsychological rehabilitation does not improve cognitive performance but reduces perceived cognitive deficits

This study from Finland looked at determining the effects of strategy-oriented neuropsychological rehabilitation on MS. 102 people with relapsing-remitting MS were recruited with subjective and objective attentional deficits. They were randomised into an intervention group and a control group. 

The intervention group received neuropsychological rehabilitation once a week for one hour for 13 weeks in total. The control group received no intervention. Neuropsychological assessments were performed at baseline, three months after the intervention and at six months. The rehabilitation included computer-based attention and working memory retraining, psychoeducation, strategy learning and psychological support. 

They found that neuropsychological rehabilitation did not improve cognitive performance but it did have a positive effect on perceived cognitive deficits. The intervention group perceived significantly fewer deficits than the control group both immediately after the intervention and at six months. Therefore strategy-based neuropsychological rehabilitation did not improve cognitive performance but reduced perceived cognitive deficits in MS.

Authors: Mäntynen A, Rosti-Otajärvi E

Source: Mult Scler. 2013 Jun 26. [Epub ahead of print]

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